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Berny

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Reply with quote  #1 
Here is a card that I have never seen before from the 1978 ANA convention in Houston, TX. Is this a private card? Look at the statement at the bottom of the card. What does "The Second Numismatic Souvenir Card" at the top mean?

Houston_1978_f1.jpg 
Houston_1978_f1a.jpg

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1978-BEP-ANA-2nd-Numismatic-Souvenir-Card-0027-Houston-Texas/223027125758?hash=item33ed73ddfe:g[redface]rAAAOSwnHZYj7s~:sc:USPSFirstClass!87544!US!-1

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Berny

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Reply with quote  #2 
I guess that the following explains it all.
Can someone post the original cards.
Memphis_1977_f1.jpg 

Memphis_1977_b2.jpg 



Memphis_1977_b1.jpg  Memphis_1977_f1a.jpg


https://www.ebay.com/itm/1977-Doovas-First-National-Paper-Money-Convention-Souvenir-Card-153-Memphis-Tn/223027125753?hash=item33ed73ddf9:g:sqgAAOSw9GhYkfrI:sc:USPSFirstClass!87544!US!-1



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GregAlex

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Reply with quote  #3 
Ah ha! You have spotted a couple Doovas cards! These are fairly scarce and there's a story behind them. They are, in fact, legitimate BEP engravings and are actually still being sold at the BEP Store as "Historical Vignettes." They are not considered souvenir cards because in their original state they are not souvenirs of anything. But the SCCS did give them PV (Portrait-Vignette) catalog numbers, which are not widely used.

Back in 1977 William Doovas purchased a large number of the East View Capitol vignettes and overprinted them with additional text and serial numbers, with the intention of selling them at the Memphis IPMS that year. Understandably, a lot of people assumed they were official Bureau souvenir cards. As you can see, Doovas went to a lot of trouble to create paperwork explaining that these were only bought from the Bureau and the rest was his own invention. I'm not sure how well they sold or for how much, but I think he produced four varieties in all, over several years. Because these were not official issues, the SCCS opted not to give them catalog numbers, so they fall into the category of private cards. They have been written up in one of the early Souvenir Card Journals; I'll see if I can dig up any further information.

Here's what the original vignette card of the Capitol looks like.

BEP Capitol east view.jpg

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mikelaw

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Reply with quote  #4 
Doovas cards ? Amazing.
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Mike
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TennisCoach

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Reply with quote  #5 
Well that shed some light on a little known subject.  First time I have heard about a Doovas card or there being four varieties.  
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GregAlex

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Reply with quote  #6 
I had to go all the way back to 1982 in my box of Souvenir Card Journals (the year after the SCCS was founded) to find the whole story about these cards. It's quite fascinating and the effort Doovas put into getting these cards printed is remarkable. I'll try to provide an abbreviated version here.

The story starts in 1977, well before cell phones, fax machines, and computerized typesetting. At that time the Bureau of Engraving and Printing had been selling souvenir cards for a number of years, but their primary focus was on philatelic cards. Only one numismatic card per year was being issued for the annual ANA show. The BEP believed stamp collectors were the main buyers of these products (probably true) and refused to budge on adding any other coin or paper money shows to the line-up.

The first National Paper Money Show (later IPMS) was planned for June in Memphis that year. Doovas took it upon himself to create a card for the Memphis show, eventually landing on the idea of overprinting an actual BEP vignette card. He decided on the "Capitol - East View" which appeared on the current $50 FRN. The original idea was to produce 1500 cards, but when he went to buy them, he learned that only 315 were in stock. Time was short so that number had to suffice. (Only 300 were printed, with the extras kept for potential printer spoilage.)

Doovas obtained some historical information about the vignette from the BEP and crafted a lengthy caption to use on the card. The text was written up and submitted to a local printing house which set it in lead type. One last-minute error was discovered which required a full line of type to be reset. But the end result looked good and things were moving along.

Around this time, Doovas got a long-distance phone call from James Conlon, Director of the BEP, asking what these vignette cards were going to be used for. When Doovas explained the project, Conlon went ballistic, accusing him of "bastardizing" the card for personal gain and demanding that all work be stopped and the cards returned for a refund. He threatened legal action and said he would contact the Secret Service if Doovas proceeded. Conlon also cut off any future purchases of vignette cards.

Fortunately Bill Doovas wasn't an easy man to rattle. He contacted the Secret Service himself and then the Federal Trade Commission to determine whether any law had been broken. He was assured that if he made it clear to buyers what the card was, then there was no issue with false advertising. This led to a typed notice sheet with an extremely detailed description of "The Card." Doovas covered himself by requiring each card buyer to sign this notice as proof that they knew it wasn't an official BEP card.

The cards were serial numbered 1 to 300 and sold at the show in June for $10 each. Conlon retired a month later, but Acting Director Seymour Berry continued to pursue the matter. The BEP complained to the US senators in Doovas' home state, and he responded with a lengthy and well supported letter.

Finally Doovas got in touch with the Bureau's legal counsel directly. After another few weeks of wrangling, Doovas proposed the addition of a disclaimer on any future cards clearly stating that the vignette was BEP, but the cards were privately produced. Eventually Berry agreed to this and Doovas was allowed to buy an additional 100 of the Capitol cards, which were overprinted with the new text and sold by mail after the Memphis show.

Doovas went on to produce private cards for two more shows -- the 1978 Houston ANA show, which had two versions both using the BEP vignette card of the White House-South View, and the 1980 Greater New York Money Convention, using the vignette card of Independence Hall (which was mis-dated 1978). About 180 Type 1 of the ANA 78 cards were printed for the show and 525 Type 2 cards were produced after the show. 450 of the GNYMC cards were printed.

In 1978 the BEP finally decided to add a second numismatic card for IPMS to its annual program. That first year they grossly overestimated potential sales, printing more than 53,000 and selling only 28,000. But the move opened the door for more numismatic cards, with FUN added in 1983 and other paper money shows a few years later. By 1990, 10 out of 12 BEP souvenir cards were numismatic. So despite the small number of Doovas cards released, they have made lasting impact.

Doovas ANA Type 1.jpg  Doovas ANA Type 2.jpg 

I don't have an image of the Doovas GNYMC card, but here is an original BEP Independence Hall vignette card to give you some idea.

PV Independence Hall.jpg

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Berny

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Reply with quote  #7 
Here is another Doovas issue from 1976, that preceded the first Memphis show:
Doovas_1976_f1.jpg


https://www.ebay.com/itm/1976-Doovas-SPMC-ANA-85th-Anniv-Convention-LE-Souvenir-Card-137-400-10-20/372348897495?hash=item56b1b948d7:g:fW8AAOSwM91aa7Cm:sc:USPSFirstClass!87544!US!-1

bills-trading-post has some good deals on other souvenir cards.

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GregAlex

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Berny
Here is another Doovas issue from 1976, that preceded the first Memphis show:



Another couple uncataloged private cards and not very practical, size-wise -- but thus the legend begins!
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Berny

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Reply with quote  #9 
Isn't this one F1991B, a forerunner?

I can't seem to find it at http://www.souvenircards.org/gallery/F/F.html
F1991B_f2.jpg

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GregAlex

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Reply with quote  #10 
Sorry -- I'm on the road right now and haven't been very responsive. Yes, you have the correct SCCS catalog number on that one. I had hoped to post a bunch of Union cards (F) before I headed out, but ran out of time. Look for a large bunch to be added to the website sometime after the ANA show. I'm also hoping I may have the chance to scan some obscure cards at the show, if Ken Barr brings any.
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