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gnat Show full post »
 
gnat
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Neilio
I just took a quick look through the lot. No stars on any of the bills. The back number in bottom right all seem to be 964, 1062, 1063, 1064, 1066, etc....None starting with a 5. As for the 169. I attached this picture of the 169 on front. There are quite a few with the 169. I appreciate the responses. At the end of the day I would like to sell all of them. In the "experts" opinion should I get these appraised/graded? Is it worth it?

Thanks
Neilio Click image for larger version - Name: 10_169.jpg, Views: 68, Size: 549.98 KB
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Neilio
59 of the bills have the 169
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jhodgson
Neilio wrote:
59 of the bills have the 169


Wow.  

Also, the notes just before and just after the 169 groups should also be saved.  Those notes paired with the consecutive 169 note make changeover pairs which command a greater premium.  It looks like you may have up to 20 of these pairs.

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EarlySmallSizeFanatic
That is a lot of LFP 169 notes. 

How many more runs of these are out there ? 

This is why everyone should be skeptical over rare varieties / blocks: A hoard or pack could come up out of the blue.

It is to be expected that no BP's start in a 5. All of the notes from your mini hoard were printed in 1944. The last backs beginning in 5 that I am aware of were in early 1941 (500's and 600's)
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gnat
I wouldn't ever generalize on the rarity of most varieties.

The 169 lfp variety for the B-D block had a number of examples and small runs turn up shortly after the variety was announced - and at least one Change Over Pair (shown in first post).  Few examples of the B-C block have turned up, and no runs. Only one star to date.

This variety is fairly common, and the good new is that a fair number of collectors can obtain a nice example.

Other late finished plate (and wide/narrow) varieties have been known for decades and the relative scarcity hasn't changed much, despite people looking for them for a long time. While a run of any previously scarce or rare note may turn up unexpectedly, this becomes more remote of a possibility as time passes.
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TookyBandit

I have several B-D 169 examples including a C.O.P. They’re super cool and potentially scarce but I’d only call the stars rare “Two known” and I’d label the B-C’s (All high SN’s) as  “Very Scarce”.  


I’m still interested in the group, but the O.P., as of yet, has not responded to my inquiry.

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larry510
TookyBandit wrote:

I have several B-D 169 examples including a C.O.P. They’re super cool and potentially scarce but I’d only call the stars rare “Two known” and I’d label the B-C’s (All high SN’s) as  “Very Scarce”.  


I’m still interested in the group, but the O.P., as of yet, has not responded to my inquiry.



Wow this was an interesting find but now there's too many BD blocks. 😉. Hide those suckers and slow roll them over time is the best strategy.  I was the one who found the top pop BC block in 65epq.  Haven't seen any uncirculated examples since.
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thereyreyes
This is such a fantastic post, thank you! I know it's an older post, but I'm hoping someone will see this reply. I am a very novice collector and have recently become interested in the North Africa Emergency issue notes. Particularly 1934 and 1934A Star notes with the yellow seal. Can anyone elaborate on those particular notes? Thank you for your time.
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gnat
Hi @thereyreyes,

I'm happy that you enjoyed this post. As you know, the $5 1934A and $10 1934 and 1934A North African notes were Silver Certificates (instead of Federal Reserve Notes).  I am not aware of a thread that specifically discusses the North African notes (though they have always been immensely popular with collectors). 

The 1934 $10 North Africa notes only come as Mules and the 1934A NAs are all Non-Mules. The 1934 NAs are scarce, and high collector demand has kept prices high.

There have been attempts by the unscrupulous to remove the "A" from series 1934A and pass them off as 1934 series. However, these alterations can be easily detected as genuine 1934 NAs will only come with the following front plate numbers: 116. 122, 123, 125, 126 and 127.

The 1934 NA Stars are significant rarities and the small number of known examples (all circulated) tend to bring strong prices.  The 1934A Stars are relatively available, though high grade examples can be pricey.

1934A NA notes also come as a variety: Late finished Face Plates #86.   Stars of the lfp #86 are also known but scarce.
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thereyreyes
Thank you @gnat! This truly is a fantastic community forum. Nowhere else would I expect a response the same day, let alone the same week 😁 

I recently acquired a few high grade $10 1934A NAs, and understand the 1934 version will be next to impossible to attain, but one can hope! 

Thanks, again, for your insight.
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EarlySmallSizeFanatic
gnat wrote:
Hi @thereyreyes,

I'm happy that you enjoyed this post. As you know, the $5 1934A and $10 1934 and 1934A North African notes were Silver Certificates (instead of Federal Reserve Notes).  I am not aware of a thread that specifically discusses the North African notes (though they have always been immensely popular with collectors). 

The 1934 $10 North Africa notes only come as Mules and the 1934A NAs are all Non-Mules. The 1934 NAs are scarce, and high collector demand has kept prices high.

There have been attempts by the unscrupulous to remove the "A" from series 1934A and pass them off as 1934 series. However, these alterations can be easily detected as genuine 1934 NAs will only come with the following front plate numbers: 116. 122, 123, 125, 126 and 127.

The 1934 NA Stars are significant rarities and the small number of known examples (all circulated) tend to bring strong prices.  The 1934A Stars are relatively available, though high grade examples can be pricey.

1934A NA notes also come as a variety: Late finished Face Plates #86.   Stars of the lfp #86 are also known but scarce.


The genuine 1934's should have micro face plates, while altered 1934A to 1934 would have macro face plates, as all 1934A's have macro face plates. 
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