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dogsranley
Does anyone know why there are many different seal colors used for these early series ?
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HoneyBadger
Another good question is...why did they not use green ink on Series of 1914 FRN seals? And why was a color like purple not used?


FRN Collections Complete - 1928-1934 LGS: $5 [87%] - $10 [37%] - $20 [2%] - $50 [6%] - $100 [0%] - $500 [0%]

http://www.1928notes.com - If you have a new note to add, please let me know.
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tigertrader

I dont think this thread specifically answers this question but its a goodie:

http://www.papermoneyforum.com/post/lgs-vs-dgs-educational-thread-8595527?highlight=green+seal+transition&trail=75
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dogsranley
To answer your question: Again, I knew the answer 50 years ago, but the details escape me. It had something to do with the print date (1917?), and the availability of certain ink colors due to World War 1
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Jamericon
Green wasn't the standard color for FRNs prior to 1928. Large size notes, except gold certificates, were printed with red or blue seals and serials. Treasury made green the standard for FRNs when they standardized colors for the change the small-size currency. 
Jamie Yakes--U.S. paper money collector, researcher, and author. | Join the SPMC.
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HoneyBadger
Food for thought...would you like 1914 FRNs more or less if they had green seals?
FRN Collections Complete - 1928-1934 LGS: $5 [87%] - $10 [37%] - $20 [2%] - $50 [6%] - $100 [0%] - $500 [0%]

http://www.1928notes.com - If you have a new note to add, please let me know.
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jhodgson
dogsranley wrote:
To answer your question: Again, I knew the answer 50 years ago, but the details escape me. It had something to do with the print date (1917?), and the availability of certain ink colors due to World War 1


The BEP switched from red to blue on Series 1914 FRNs due to inferior fading properties of the red ink.  It was not due to availability of pigments.

Want to increase your knowledge about US small sized currency? Find interesting tidbits about US small size currency:

https://www.facebook.com/American-Paper-Connection-Inc-585643014808093/?ref=bookmarks
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GregAlex
Along the lines of LGS vs DGS, is there color variation in the orange seal used on gold certificates? Has anyone ever done a comparative analysis?
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EarlySmallSizeFanatic
GregAlex: Yes, there are three different hues that I am aware of on 1928 GC's.

I recently found out why the discrepancy on 1934 LGS to DGS seals. Some of us say the change was later in November 1937, with the first stars on December 06, 1937. I have been recently saying that the change is November 01, 1937, and a couple others concur. 

In the past week, I have found out that I see colors different than most people, I am a tetrachromat, and never heard that terminology until my vision test. 

Strangely, this usually affects women and is rare in women, but extremely rare in men. 

Here is an explanation: 

https://www.healthline.com/health/tetrachromacy

So I am seeing a color between the shade in the Summer of 1937 and the other starting in December 1937 that most people can't see.
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HoneyBadger
There are most definitely seal color varieties on 1928 Gold Certificates. They are a tad bit more subtle, but the shifts are there. There are some differences with the 1934 Gold Certificates as well. The key to seeing this are the much higher serial numbers on the $10 1928 B-A blocks.
FRN Collections Complete - 1928-1934 LGS: $5 [87%] - $10 [37%] - $20 [2%] - $50 [6%] - $100 [0%] - $500 [0%]

http://www.1928notes.com - If you have a new note to add, please let me know.
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