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HoneyBadger Show full post »
 
CurrenSee
Steve in Tampa wrote:
One of my favorite fantasy notes



This was one I created in Photoshop a few years ago. I actually never got around to finishing it.
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HoneyBadger
EarlySmallSizeFanatic wrote:
While starting the NC08 ledger, there is mention of $5 series 1923 Legal Tenders. 

Plates were made in eight subject form, but notes were never printed. 


A red seal porthole note? How insanely cool would that have been... *sigh*
FRN Collections Complete - 1928-1934 LGS: $5 [87%] - $10 [37%] - $20 [2%] - $50 [6%] - $100 [0%] - $500 [0%]

http://www.1928notes.com - If you have a new note to add, please let me know.
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Jamericon
LT-1920-$20 face & back incomplete.jpg 
Jamie Yakes--U.S. paper money collector, researcher, and author. | Join the SPMC.
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Jamericon
SC-no date-$1 face #1.jpg 
Jamie Yakes--U.S. paper money collector, researcher, and author. | Join the SPMC.
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Jamericon
NBN-1902-title block in frame right reading.jpg 
Jamie Yakes--U.S. paper money collector, researcher, and author. | Join the SPMC.
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TogoThreeDollarBill

wrote:


The crazy part of it not being issued is that the denomination was more popular than $2 in obsolete banknotes.  There were $3 and 3c coins minted prior to the Civil War in larger quantities but smaller during the war.  Even after the war some non-Federal govt issuers were using the $3 denomination as late as the mid 1870s:
mobile31875.jpg 


Really? That's very interesting to know that the $3 bill was more popular than the $2 bill when private banks issued them. The guy who did the film "The $2 Bill Documentary" said he believes that the $3 bill would've been doomed from the start, had a Federal $3 note been issued. Here's what we said, in the comments about a video he did about when they ceased production of the $2 bill in 1966 and brought it back in 1976:

ME:

This always makes me wonder a few questions. Had the U.S. went through with one of it's two proposals in the 1860's where a law called for issuance of a $3 bill, would the $3 bill have lasted in circulation as long as the $2 bill did, before it was discontinued? Would the $3 bill have been discontinued "before" the $2 bill was discontinued? (I'd bet anything that the $3 would've been discontinued, considerably sooner than the $2 if they would've printed $3's and I'd also wager it would be harder to bring back the $3 than it was, the $2) And if so, would they have eventually began printing $3 bills again, possibly with a new design, as well? And as crazy as it may sound, if we were still using physical cash in 2076, and the $3 bill were discontinued, even over a hundred years before, would they have brought the $3 back for the "Tricentennial" of the country?

The $2 Bill Documentary Guy (John)

All good questions, but I think the $3 bill would have been doomed from the start. Even if they made one, it would not have lasted long. As it was, a $3 bill was in the works in 1863 but they never ended up making it. Regardless of where inflation left us or what the price systems were back then (and even now), I don't think people would have been happy sorting through their $1s, $2s and $3s to find the right combination. It's just too much. Hand them a $5 and get your change, period. The $3 would have been DOA.

 

I tend to disagree with the $3 bill failing right away, in fact, had it actually been produced, I feel there might've been a good chance we'd have had a $3 Federal Reserve note. At least, in the early days of Federal Reserve notes. But the fact of the $3 bill being more popular than the $2 bill in the past is news to me.

On another note, when I asked if there were anyone who might like a $3 bill in the U.S. on a different forum decades ago, one person said "Horse racing tracks would love a $3 bill, because they could bump up their $2 minimum bet to a $3 minimum bet (I guess they'd rather bump it up to $3 rather than bumping it up $3 to $5 minimum bets, not that they couldn't still bump it up to $3 and maybe circulate $2 bills and $1 coins, or Hell, bump it up to $2.50 and circulate $2 bills and halves among those race tracks. 

I do know about the $3 and 3-cent coins though.

 

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MEC2
Numerically speaking, a $3 makes more sense than a $2 bill. But neither is really that useful, as shown by the fact few people use $2 bills. I know, because I toss them about all the time and people act like they just saw a leprechaun riding a unicorn...
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TogoThreeDollarBill

MEC2 wrote:
Numerically speaking, a $3 makes more sense than a $2 bill. But neither is really that useful, as shown by the fact few people use $2 bills. I know, because I toss them about all the time and people act like they just saw a leprechaun riding a unicorn...

Just curious but, why does a $3 bill make more sense than a $2 bill? I mean, a $2 bill is an even-numbered denomination, while a $3 bill is an odd-numbered denomination. And although $1 and $5 bills are all odd-numbered denominations, you could at least add them up to an even number up to $100 and beyond (one hundred $1 bills or twenty $5 bills while a $3 bill would reach $99 instead of $100 hundred, not to mention many other odd amounts $3's could add up to) Do not get me wrong, I'd love to see a successful resurrection of the U.S. government's original plan to issue a $3 note, but even though I am pushing for that idea to finally come to fruition, I am not holding my breath.

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MEC2
It makes little sense to make a double iteration of your basic denomination -  think how useless a two cent coin is.  A three serves the purpose of three single notes. It wins as being marginally more useful on that basis.
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YoungCollector
If we shift our numbering system to base 12 then the three would be pretty handy.
But in base 10 I am not so sure ...
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MEC2
It's about utility to the nearest other denomination - you would not make a $101 bill for the same reason you would not make a $2, though it is more obvious in that example (it's like the Let's Make a Deal/Monty Hall problem, should you change your chosen door, the answer is yes but it is not obvious, until you imagine there being 100 doors and going through the same exercise...)
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