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HoneyBadger Show full post »
 
larry510


And their notes will sit in park until the cows come home. 

There are notes on eBay that have been there since 2016 and even 2015, and have not budged. 


Right.  These seller's originally won these notes on eBay for a good price and are now holding the notes hostage for years by putting moon prices on them.
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HoneyBadger
I hate to ask this silly question....but would this hobby be better off if 97.5% of all the early circulated crap was turned in and destroyed?
FRN Collections Complete - 1928-1934 LGS: $5 [87%] - $10 [37%] - $20 [2%] - $50 [6%] - $100 [0%] - $500 [0%]

http://www.1928notes.com - If you have a new note to add, please let me know.
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Steve in Tampa
Currency Crematorium Services
PO Box 1212
Tampa, FL. 33607
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HoneyBadger
Currency Crematorium Services
PO Box 1212
Tampa, FL. 33607


5A39CFB5-B694-4FD7-BD67-DE04514B2848.jpeg 

Cant tell if suspicious.
FRN Collections Complete - 1928-1934 LGS: $5 [87%] - $10 [37%] - $20 [2%] - $50 [6%] - $100 [0%] - $500 [0%]

http://www.1928notes.com - If you have a new note to add, please let me know.
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jhodgson
larry510 wrote:


Right.  These seller's originally won these notes on eBay for a good price and are now holding the notes hostage for years by putting moon prices on them.


There are a lot of them on eBay.  Do collectors actually buy them?  Seems like a lot of overhead in these notes and probably not much return on overall investment when compared to the total overhead.  I know someone who has a Masters in Business from Northwestern.  When I explained/showed these eBay listings, she just shook her head in amazement.

Want to increase your knowledge about US small sized currency? Find interesting tidbits about US small size currency:

https://www.facebook.com/American-Paper-Connection-Inc-585643014808093/?ref=bookmarks
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TookyBandit
Low grade material has a healthy market, it’s just a different market than some people are looking for.
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jhodgson
TookyBandit wrote:
Low grade material has a healthy market, it’s just a different market than some people are looking for.


I agree.  It is a different market. When I have my junk box set up at shows, I cannot keep it full.  My return is not great, but I am successful at getting rid of the this stuff.

Edited to add - I have been a buyer of $5 1928-B and 1934 LGS notes for years in low grade.  They are easy to sell.

Want to increase your knowledge about US small sized currency? Find interesting tidbits about US small size currency:

https://www.facebook.com/American-Paper-Connection-Inc-585643014808093/?ref=bookmarks
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larry510
HoneyBadger wrote:
I hate to ask this silly question....but would this hobby be better off if 97.5% of all the early circulated crap was turned in and destroyed?


It's a yes from me!  There's too much of it clogging up coin shops and dealer inventory with not a lot of buyers.  
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MaineJoe
TookyBandit wrote:
Low grade material has a healthy market, it’s just a different market than some people are looking for.
 
Yep, that would be where I'm at. But it's getting tough to stay in it lately.
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MaineJoe
If anyone's junk box is getting a bit clogged up just send me a message 👍
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MaineJoe
 I will have a small prediction again. The flippers and deep pocketed buyer out right now will make it even harder for legitimate buyers to do any buys, after this mess settles down. Like I said above "can't unsee something after you already have". They have found a neat new outlet for buying and are running with it, and likely will continue.
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EarlySmallSizeFanatic
As for the S/L Catalog, I met John Schwartz last year at the show in Connecticut, and he concurred that there would be no new editions. 

I guess it is up to one (or more)  of us to come up with a new edition of a new catalog. ðŸ˜
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larry510
MaineJoe wrote:
If anyone's junk box is getting a bit clogged up just send me a message ðŸ‘


You should see all the coin shops here in California that have tons of that stuff that never sells.  Maybe it's different in other parts but that's my opinion on it.
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larry510
As for the S/L Catalog, I met John Schwartz last year at the show in Connecticut, and he concurred that there would be no new editions. 

I guess it is up to one (or more)  of us to come up with a new edition of a new catalog. Ã°Å¸ËœÂ


I nominate our own Tookybandit to do a new book.  😉. Maybe Jim and Randy can help too.  I'll certainly make a nice donation to anyone who can pull it off and hopefully others would as well.
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mebid2much
larry510 wrote:


I nominate our own Tookybandit to do a new book.  😉. Maybe Jim and Randy can help too.  I'll certainly make a nice donation to anyone who can pull it off and hopefully others would as well.

+1 ðŸ™ðŸ™ðŸ™
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EarlySmallSizeFanatic
larry510 wrote:


I nominate our own Tookybandit to do a new book.  😉. Maybe Jim and Randy can help too.  I'll certainly make a nice donation to anyone who can pull it off and hopefully others would as well.


I would want to see Honeybadger do work on pricing.

I have lots of data that nobody else has on the forums, that I have not shared, ( I keep filing FOIAS and getting new information) so I would be a major contributor as well. 

Randy, Tooky, Jim, HB, Jamie, Larry, and me could pull it off. The book could have pricing, printing totals (if possible), census data, rarity, and other useful data. Other contributors (well versed in modern notes like Tigertrader, Joe, and others could help too).
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HoneyBadger
At the risk of sounding like a Communist...would it have to be a money making venture? I know a lot of people here who would help with such a project just for the good of the hobby.
FRN Collections Complete - 1928-1934 LGS: $5 [87%] - $10 [37%] - $20 [2%] - $50 [6%] - $100 [0%] - $500 [0%]

http://www.1928notes.com - If you have a new note to add, please let me know.
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jhodgson
Here is a fact - Scott Lindquist did not enjoy it at all.

Want to increase your knowledge about US small sized currency? Find interesting tidbits about US small size currency:

https://www.facebook.com/American-Paper-Connection-Inc-585643014808093/?ref=bookmarks
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MaineJoe
jhodgson wrote:
Here is a fact - Scott Lindquist did not enjoy it at all.


 That's right! Scott, John and others did a lot of the initial work to form a reference book that has stood up well over time. I mean you're not rewriting the bible, merely enhancing and continuing.Would it be possible for collaborated passions to pull it off? Most of what was done in the 10th would carry on with modifications and corrections/additions to areas that need it then continue on to modern issue. Truth be known (if there are other OCDers like me out there), there are notes made right in the 10th on your desk. I have seen some of you fellas 10th Ed's and I know they have been around the block and then some. I actually have a backup to my "goto" 10th when it finally reaches it's maker. Also in this day and age is it that tough to get or find a publisher? There are self publishing sights around every corner
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MaineJoe
Just a curious question while on this subject. Does anyone know where the rights to the 10th ended up? KP FW Media is no more. Did it end in the hands of Random House (Penguin Random House-PRH), or is it with Active Interest Media? Seems there may be some cloudiness there as to where the copyrights wound up after FW went down. Only reason I ask that direction is that in today's digital world it wouldn't take much to digitally scan and modify the existing book. Not saying copy it in entirety, but use it's format to continue and enhance to a modern edition.

Edit: After searching the U.S. Copyright Office records this is who I found that holds the right to the 10th Edition-
Cortland Capital Market Services, LLC along with some other 1055 titles acquired from FW Media when it went down. They are/were the $$ behind FW. But further research found that Cortland is now an acquisition of Alter Domus-a fully integrated Fund and Corporate services provider. So what's the chance that the books copyright is buried in some obscure paper string somewhere?
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Steve in Tampa
Was the SGSS printed in any languages besides english ?
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EarlySmallSizeFanatic
HoneyBadger wrote:
I hate to ask this silly question....but would this hobby be better off if 97.5% of all the early circulated crap was turned in and destroyed?


Perhaps some of the earlier stuff, but no for other stuff. 

The market is full of 1950's and 60's era USN's and SC's in low grade, and a lower population of that material would only help it. 

1928 series FRN's, LGS notes, most mules, and varieties have a market in low grade. 

Many early star notes are still pricey in low grade, and for some issues, there may only be a handful known, all in low grade. 

For those items, I would say no, it is nice to have low end material. This is how many youngsters get their collections started off. 

IMG_0037-2.jpg 
Here is a good example for stars: Note is a low end VF with obvious staining (a problem note), but the highest graded is a 35. The total population on these is four (one unconfirmed in an unknown grade and one in WORSE condition than my note above ). 

In this case, with the exception of a nice mid grade example, these only come in low grade, and that is if you are lucky enough to locate one. 

Another good example is the $10 1934B star notes from districts: Cleveland (do they exist ???), Richmond, Atlanta, Minneapolis, and Dallas. All come almost entirely in low (or at best mid) grade and have tiny handfuls known to exist. These notes are very pricey.
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