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GregAlex
The Year of the Pig is upon us! This seems like a good opportunity to post some of the many Chinese scenes that American Bank Note produced in the early to mid 20th century. You can find some of these on souvenir cards and in the ABNC Archive Series. But the vast majority are available quite inexpensively on USPS Commemorative Panels, printed on contract by ABNC.

Starting in 1992, the Postal Service began issuing annual stamps to mark the Chinese New Year. Since ABNC had a large library of thematic vignettes, they were perfectly positioned to use them on the panels. I've identified a number of usages for these vignettes on currency, but I welcome others to post match-ups (you don't have to own the note).

Here's the 1994 Commemorative Panel (CP452), which they called the Year of the "Boar," to be polite. It includes a portrait of Emperor Huangti -- the "Yellow" Emperor, who ruled China from 2697 to 2597 BC. He appears on a 100 yuan specimen note from 1913, along with the Temple of Heaven, which is depicted on another panel.

Chinese CP452a.jpg 
Chinese CP452b.jpg 
CP452.jpg 

Huangti specimen.jpg 

Chinese CP481c.jpg 

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GregAlex
Here are some of those that I know have appeared on Chinese currency or proofs:

Chinese CP504b.jpg 

Chinese CP216.jpg 
Chinese CP481a.jpg 

Chinese CP557b.jpg 

ABN Archive China C.jpg 
ABN Archive China A.jpg  CP616 temple.jpg 


Chinese CP531b.jpg 


CP616 Worthy.jpg 
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Dan Cong
I have some of those ABNco vignettes. That's a pretty extensive collection you got there. Here is a nice gold bond. Some people live in hope the Chinese Government will finally pay up on their sovereign debt in gold as they promised. 

China Chinese Government 5% Reorganisation Gold Loan of 1913 £20 $74 o.jpg 
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GregAlex
Dan Cong wrote:
I have some of those ABNco vignettes. That's a pretty extensive collection you got there.


Thanks, and there's more to come tomorrow. I like that bond!
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GregAlex
Okay, here is the rest of the batch. I have yet to find usages for these, but I suspect they appeared on bonds or were done on spec for possible later use.

ABN Archive China D.jpg 

ABN Archive China B.jpg 

Chinese CP120a.jpg 

Chinese CP120b.jpg 

 
Chinese CP236a.jpg 

Chinese CP236b.jpg 

Chinese CP434a.jpg 

Chinese CP434b.jpg   


Chinese CP481b.jpg


Chinese CP504a.jpg 

Chinese CP531a.jpg 
Country view.jpg  Joss house.jpg
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GregAlex
I discovered one more usage I didn't know about. This one appears on a specimen of a Frontier Bank note.

Chinese CP236a.jpg 

Frontier Bank specimen.jpg   
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Steve in Tampa
Wonderful vignettes. Some, or maybe most of them, I’m seeing for the first time.

Very nice.
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CurrencyDen1
Washington is father of his country, right?  Wait, not China....
    china proof.jpg 
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GregAlex
What the ...?  I have George on many notes and other items, but I never expected him to show up in China!
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DonEinNY
Not directly related to the thread, but I am posting it here since it prominently features two Chinese notes.  An interesting production spec sheet showing the selection of various design elements for the back of some country's £½ note. The sheet shows the design numbers for borders, frames, undertints, rosettes, and guilloches to be used in the laydown for the £½ note. The sheet is lithographed and measures 17" W × 14" H.

China Layout.jpg 
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GregAlex
That's an intriguing mystery! Looks like they were piecing together interesting ornaments for the back of a half pound note. That's an oddity in itself, as you would expect 1/2 pound to be expressed as 10 shillings. Given enough time, someone could probably figure out which note this became, but there are a lot of British colonies you'd have to examine.
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DonEinNY
I, too, am a little bewildered by the reference to a "£½" note.  I wonder if this was used for training rather than being a spec sheet for an actual note to be produced.  If you produce a £½ note and it makes its way into circulation, it will likely raise some eyebrows and warrant a second look.
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