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NessunDorma
Hello all: Since I have decided to focus my collection primarily on graded notes from the 1923 - 1934 series, I have a question that I would like to ask the far more knowledgeable collectors on here.

Say I have a particular note I am looking for, in this hypothetical example a 1928 $20 Gold Certificate, and I have a choice of the following:
63PPQ:    $699
64PPQ:    $999
65PPQ:  $2750
Which makes the most sense from a value point of view, assuming that I would keep the note and possibly sell it in a few years' time? I understand that the higher grades might have better visual appeal, but what about from an investment point of view?

At the moment I am building my personal collection with little intent to resell it. In these uncertain times however, one never knows when this might become necessary, so I want to ensure I don't handcuff myself in the future by choosing the cheaper option today.

What say you all? Thanks!
BLACK LIVES MATTER
END WHITE AMERICAN APARTHEID NOW
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gnat
For a relatively plentiful note like a $20 1928 Gold Certificate, you will want to obtain at least a Gem 65Q if not a 66Q -- as the price difference between grades are nowhere as steep as you indicated.

For scarcer notes, a nice original 64Q may be where you want to be.

But, regardless of the grade on the holder, eye appeal is of paramount importance. Not all notes -- even of the same technical grade -- are equal. And for a nice type note, you can and should be picky. Look and compare and wait for the right note. This is how rewarding collections are built; with the best chance at finding buyers (a good return) if and when the time comes to sell.
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NessunDorma
Thank you gnat for your advice. Makes perfect sense. As for those prices I had mentioned, the notes are all currently for sale on eBay so I just used that as an example.
BLACK LIVES MATTER
END WHITE AMERICAN APARTHEID NOW
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Steve in Tampa

Our reasons for collecting are at polar opposites. Buying with the intent of selling for profit is heavily dependent on the deal you get today. If you overpay for a note today, regardless of the grade, you may never recover your investment. My advise would be to be patient, do your research, reach out to other collectors and stay away from bargain (problem) notes. @gnat makes good points with regards to eye appeal and desirability. Most of the great collections sold over the last decade have been notes bought raw because of their great eye appeal and originality and recently graded. Buy the note, not the holder. 


Who would of thought back in December that the stock market would loose 25% within a month. Predicting the collector market can be just as volatile. 

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gnat
FYI, prices on eBay can be all over the place. Check out dealer websites and Heritage's auction archives to get a better feel for current pricing.

Unless you are seeking (and have the opportunity to buy) very scarce or rare notes that seldom come to market, patience will pay large rewards.
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whybee
Invest in the market today, if you're looking to make profits for tomorrow.
Mike
Interested in Maryland nationals and obsoletes
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MEC2
Yeah I'd be wary about using collectibles as an investment - they can store value, and if you shop right, you can gain value, but they will never beat buying into a down market with stocks and such. Get into distressed stocks, and in a couple years sell, and buy three times the currency you could have today.
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synchr
Buy the best note you can afford.
Higher grade collectibles appreciate faster over time than lower graded ones

Right now, I am watch the movement of gold, but have always enjoyed owning Gold Certificate Notes, especially the $50 as they are very special!
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YoungCollector
MEC2 wrote:
Yeah I'd be wary about using collectibles as an investment


Stamps have pretty much gone to zero, grandfather clocks too.

Even most gold certificates aren't worth the statutory amount of gold that once backed them.

Oh, and when you buy and sell stocks and bonds you are charged about 0.01% to do so.
I think the auction houses are now charging ... what?  is it 20 pct or 25 pct to buy a currency note?
That is a mighty steep hill to climb when you start out 25 pct in the hole.
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MEC2
I loved stamps, my grandfather collected them assiduously and I had a very nice collection, loved them for the same reasons I love currency - the beautiful engraving. Alas, when folks found out just how many stamps were out there... poof. I still have several stamp books but never really had the passion he did, my collection dates from my youth. He taught me how to put them in the mount strips, fold in the sides, hinge fold the strip so the stamp never flexed... ah, the good old days.
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serenitystan
Save all your bickies and buy the rarest and highest grade possible as a Investment..Whatever the scarcity of a particular note,if there is no one in the market who wishes to buy it cannot be expected to achieve a high price..Conversely,the same item actively sought by numerous potential buyers may cause the price to Rise...
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TomTomTomTom


Stamps have pretty much gone to zero, grandfather clocks too.


I have my stamp collection from 30 years ago because I still like them rather than what they are worth...and I have a grandfather clock...0 for 2, I guess!
Always looking for high quality fractional notes, specimens, proofs, experimentals and anything fractional related
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stevie wonder
Question: Why have stamps pretty much gone to zero? It depends which stamps you are talking about, I believe. Stamps from 1948-1932 still have value. The William Gross collection which sold at Siegel Auction Galleries sold for millions and millions of dollars last year. I think its the modern day stamps that have only postage value.
Lets not forget currency. What is currency issued in 2000-2020 worth? If there were no Registry sets how many collectors would own these notes in Third Party Slabs?
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stevie wonder
Sorry I should have said stamps from 1848-1932 still have value. 
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maxcrusha (aka Greg)
most of the slabbed 2000-2020 notes are low serial #'s, errors, small print runs, fancy serial #'s...  and yes, for registry sets.  Many reasons to get modern notes slabbed.

Any example of each (low serial #'s, errors, small print runs, fancy serial #'s):

2009 $10 00000002 front.jpg  2006 ny error $10 front.jpg  s-l1600.jpg    2006 $100 00999900 star front.jpg 
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MaineJoe
Question: Why have stamps pretty much gone to zero? It depends which stamps you are talking about, I believe. Stamps from 1948-1932 still have value. The William Gross collection which sold at Siegel Auction Galleries sold for millions and millions of dollars last year. I think its the modern day stamps that have only postage value.
Lets not forget currency. What is currency issued in 2000-2020 worth? If there were no Registry sets how many collectors would own these notes in Third Party Slabs?


 You are right on one hand, old stamps do still have a value. But all of them still have a postage value. I use them from time to time to apply postage to mailings (from 1930's to current). Now as for modern currency having a value? As has always been, sets, blocks, series and so on do have a value. Maybe more so because they are a labor to put together. But modern do still have errors and the like that do demand a premium as do certain serials. Also the high grades will demand a premium for registry sets as well as just the simple high grade. I admit that moderns do bring a challenge that isn't the same as the older types. Nonetheless there is still a niche with moderns that have appeal to some collectors.
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stevie wonder
Maine Joe and Maxcrusha, thank you for your information. You are correct, and I have learned something else today and the day is still early. ðŸ˜·
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YoungCollector
Question: Why have stamps pretty much gone to zero?


I mean this only in the context of "investments".  Back in the 1960's you could have bought collectible stamps (including those that were, at that time, old) or you could have bought stocks and bonds.  Hey, you could have even just stored recent date silver coinage away ...
When looking at the alternatives stamps have not held up well.

And, like Tom^4, I have a grandfather clock or two ... or three.
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Springfield

I always buy nice looking certified notes that I can afford. I do not care at all about winning some award or claiming my notes are better than anyone else.  My eyes are not a microscope so I can not tell the difference in a point higher graded note.  I will however use the price difference between notes to buy more notes for my collection.  

That works for me but other members may have different objectives for their collection.  Be your own person and make the choice that is right for you.  That is what matters overall. 

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