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Cinch
I purchased this note off of eBay recently. It's mentioned in the reference books, likely due to its appearance in a contemporary counterfeit detector, but Bowers lists it as "none known."

Dated May 7, 1854. Durand 1041, Haxby RI-275-N20, Bowers RI-830-010-N060

Imprint of Baldwin, Adams & Co. New York. Forged signatures of Joseph H. Bourne, cashier, and Amos D. Smith, president of the Bank of Commerce.

Does anyone recognize this as a genuine note from another bank that's been altered? Or is it a completely spurious design, maybe used on the counterfeits of other banks?

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Detail of left vignette:
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Second detail:
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RICurrency.com, old banknotes from Rhode Island
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MEC2
Strange, the ships look especially poorly done, and the eagle is pretty amateur, but the cameo looks pretty good!
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MaineMoneyMan
Hello,
Nice note!
I flipped through the Whitman volume 2 which contains CT, ME and NH. There is a New London Bank of Commerce Five of the same design listed in the non-valid issue section. That is the onlt note with an inmage in that volume that I noted matched. It does not make mention of it being altered.
I like your website! I've stumbled upon it a few times researching obsolete notes. I personally collect Maine Obsoletes.
good luck with the research.
SPMC PM014835
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Cinch
Thanks for the comments, MaineMoneyMan! And thanks for the tip about New London.

The site has been a labor of love and a good way for me to dive deeper into the background of each note and of each bank itself. The locations of these institutions have fascinated me. I've been contacted by several people who inhabit the old buildings or run organizations from them. Some even have remnants of the old vaults.

I've also gotten messages from descendants of people connected to the banks and that's interesting. One contacted me recently with a dozen small portraits of his ancestor, who had been the president of a Warwick institution in the 19th century. The little vignettes had been cut from contemporary proofs. Unfortunately, the rest of the notes did not survive. They would have been highly desirable if they had!
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MaineJoe
I found it as a spurious Providence RI note.
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Russell Kaye
Yes, it's spurious but probably from a spurious plate used for several different banks. I would have to do a bit a research (or maybe someone else can match the design) to figure out where else it was used but it looks familiar. 

Neither Haxby nor Bowers recognized that there are really two different kinds of spurious notes, and both have made the mistake of identifying some spurious notes as altered. This is because they look like altered notes but are actually from altered spurious plates. I believe that this note may be one of those.
Buying, Selling Currency and Sharing Knowledge-Especially Obsoletes.
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MaineMoneyMan
New London, CT Bank of Commerce.
SPMC PM014835
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Cinch
Thanks Russell for the input! I am not quarantined with my currency books, unfortunately, so I can't do the research I'd like, but it does seem like a spurious plate used for multiple banks. I will try to track down the New London bank MaineMoneyMan has mentioned.
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Russell Kaye
New London, CT Bank of Commerce.


Yes, this is correct. Haxby lists it as CT-310-S25, SENC and Bowers lists the a note of the same description with "None Known" comment. Here are two more spurious notes from the same bank and another New London bank where the plate was modified and used for multiple bank titles.

[815051]  [815053] 
Buying, Selling Currency and Sharing Knowledge-Especially Obsoletes.
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