,
 



PMG is the Official Grading Service of the Paper Money Forum
,
DepressionScripGuy (Rod)
May 2020 auction is up and running live right now....  for those that may have forgotten.
Come see a forgotten piece of history...
http://www.depressionscrip.com
Quote 0
 
Springfield
Why are there so many raw notes?  I would think certified notes would sell better.  
Quote 0
MEC2
NEIN NEIN NEIN! We don't bring this auction up until AFTER my low bids have scored miraculous wins...
Quote 1
slasher
MEC2 wrote:
NEIN NEIN NEIN! We don't bring this auction up until AFTER my low bids have scored miraculous wins...


I did my best to keep this from being a possibility.
Quote 0
MEC2
Well it looks like it almost worked @slasher, it *appears* I've got only two winning bids, but then again, the last time I thought my bids had won I ended up being outbid on a note I really wanted after I thought I'd won... that is finding out there is no Santa let me tell you... 
Quote 0
tigertrader
I didn't do any damage yesterday but I did a little in the Monday World Auction...
Quote 0
Amrys
MEC2 wrote:
NEIN NEIN NEIN! We don't bring this auction up until AFTER my low bids have scored miraculous wins...
Why do you write in German?
Quote 0
MaineJoe
Maybe he's been watching the series on WWII in color? Ã°Å¸Ëœâ€šÃ°Å¸Ëœâ€šÃ°Å¸Ëœâ€š
Quote 0
MEC2
Amrys wrote:
Why do you write in German?

Some things are funnier in other languages, and Nein Nein Nein has a fairly glorious history in comedy, movies, and internet memes...  usually followed by flipping out about something.

EDIT: It's sort of the most emphatic no in colloquial dialogue - another example is "oui oui", which gets tossed about as yes but with a flirtier or more breathless undertone. Or "si senor", which just means yes but is often just used time to time... just a more fun way to say yes. English is the great hijacker of languages...
Quote 0
Rhino89
MEC2 wrote:

Some things are funnier in other languages, and Nein Nein Nein has a fairly glorious history in comedy, movies, and internet memes...  usually followed by flipping out about something.

EDIT: It's sort of the most emphatic no in colloquial dialogue - another example is "oui oui", which gets tossed about as yes but with a flirtier or more breathless undertone. Or "si senor", which just means yes but is often just used time to time... just a more fun way to say yes. English is the great hijacker of languages...


I actually laughed when I read your "nein nein nein" originally, because it was the perfect response 😂 For anyone who did not recognize the origin, Tarantino's "Inglourious Basterds". Link here to the 3 second scene:

Quote 0
Amrys

MEC2 wrote:

Some things are funnier in other languages, and Nein Nein Nein has a fairly glorious history in comedy, movies, and internet memes...  usually followed by flipping out about something.

EDIT: It's sort of the most emphatic no in colloquial dialogue - another example is "oui oui", which gets tossed about as yes but with a flirtier or more breathless undertone. Or "si senor", which just means yes but is often just used time to time... just a more fun way to say yes. English is the great hijacker of languages...

Thank you for this explanation. I was just curious.

I know this TV-series too. In Germany it's called EIN KÄFIG VOLLER NARREN. Translated literally it means A CAGE FULL OF FOULS and I'm sure the fouls are the German soldiers...😋

I like your sentence: "usually followed by flipping out about something"😂

When I think of Charlie Chaplin's THE GREAT DICTATOR I remember that he used in some speeches the German words WIENER SCHNITZEL, SAUERKRAUT and LEBERWURST. All typical food here. That sounds funny, but why he's talking about food?😉
 

Quote 0
Amrys
If you want the opposite JA JA JA: Here you can hear both:
Quote 0
Springfield
Be careful if you buy raw notes from Lyn Knight.  
Quote 0
 
Forum Sponsors

 
 

,