,
 



PMG is the Official Grading Service of the Paper Money Forum
,
historyfrk219
“We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.” — Winston Churchill

There is a ton of experience and information on this forum, and I thoroughly enjoy learning and growing my numismatic knowledge from those in the community that are willing to share all their wonderful knowledge. I have learned so much in the last year so a big Thank You to everyone. 

A question then for everyone: Who has been your mentor(s) throughout your time in the hobby? Anyone that really changed the trajectory of your collecting experience?

I know that since I was little it was always the older gentlemen who worked at my local coin shop (The Coinery in Lincoln, Nebraska) who were so patient and willing to teach me about everything when I'd stop by. It's really special when I could walk in and they know me by name and ask about things going on in my life. 

“Fortune Favors the Bold and the Brave"
SPMC 15071                            http://spmc.org/
Nebraska Nationals and Obsoletes, United States Small Size Paper Money

Quote 2
 
HoneyBadger
I am my own Mentor. 😉
FRN Collections Complete - 1928-1934 LGS: $5 [87%] - $10 [37%] - $20 [2%] - $50 [6%] - $100 [0%] - $500 [0%]

http://www.1928notes.com - If you have a new note to add, please let me know.
Quote 3
larry510
HoneyBadger wrote:
I am my own Mentor. 😉

Same
Quote 2
MaineJoe
Although I could say that I too am my own mentor. I do realize that I had a direction put in front of me and I built the path from there.
 I know my father and grandfather were collectors of many things. This fostered a curiosity in me at a young age that sticks with me still. Many here have revived parts of it. Many here have intrigued aspects to generate me to expand and explore other areas and items. There are those who are in and on the top of their specialty that are looked up to and respected. They are leaders as such, but no more than how they choose to foster the knowledge and spread it willingly. I for one am more than willing to pass any knowledge I have to anyone who asks for it. Many here do the same willingly and/or if asked. So a mentor is not so much who you are but what you do with your knowledge.
Quote 3
hfjacinto
I didn't really have a mentor per say. I like to read so I get books when I want to learn. BUT there have been a few helpful people in my life.  My dad collected coins and notes, so I inherited them, but since my dad and I never got really along it wasn't like we tried to have a mentoring relationship. I still got the genes for collecting coins from him and he gave us a nice house and food. On the coin side of the hobby, I made friends with Butch. He taught me lot about coins, and he gave me direction. Sadly Butch passed away a few weeks ago. I also received a lot of helpful advice from the Poison Dart of coins and currency @coinfrog() . @coinfrog is extremely generous with advice and coins. I've gone to @coinfrog for help a lot. On here @MEC2 is just fun to read and his/her love for nationals inspires me. Then you have @Steve in Tampa that makes me drool whenever he posts something and I've also reached out to him for advice. So I guess you can say I had a few mentors along the way. 

I'll close with a note, this is the only star note I have, I inherited from my dad and while I've had no interest in star notes, I kept this one.  In a way this note from my dad inspired me to keep on collecting.IMG_4565.jpg
Quote 3
dtreter
I didn't really have a mentor but... Mike Marchioni and Martin Gengerke were keys to my knowledge of fractional currency with a few others like Rick Melamed, Jim Polis, Rob Kravitz, Art Paradis, and etc who have always answered my questions and gave advice freely.  My hat is off to them...and I will never forget  their help!!!
Quote 3
Cody71086
Dennis Forgue, Dean Oakes, Tim Kyzivat, Jim Simek, Glen Jorde, and Peter Huntoon have all passed on great chunks of knowledge to me and have helped me build my collection. I've taken it upon myself to build from that knowledge. I'm probably forgetting some and will bounce back to edit the post as I think of them.
Quote 5
Timmy3939

I Could Write a super lengthy response to this but i will make it short and sweet. Bjorn Bergstrom showed me my first Nebraska National Banknote(planted the idea), Gerome Walton a dear friend of mine and the writer of the Nebraska National Book, Peter Huntoon (ANA CLASSES), Lyn Knight, John Jackson, Albert Huie, Cody Regenitter and a bunch of others i respect greatly in the business. You will find when you reach out and start to meet some of these faces they are the most genuine and enthusiastic people in the world about paper money. I've never seen Glen Jorde not get excited when you show him a note, and he most likely has a story to tell you to match the note or the town or previous owner. 

The Names I mentioned are people i hold to the highest regard in opinion to many different topics from Census Data, Note Conditions, Market, Grading, and Business. I still do a lot of my own research and ask dumb questions from time to time. Its really important to make contacts and let people know exactly what you collect and have some resources available to share. I personally have all my Notes uploaded to a Google Doc that I can check in an instant or share with another friend or dealer. I also keep some PDF and Drop Box Files handy also encase i'm puzzled by something. Resources are at our finger tips today take advantage of them. 

Quote 4
Steve in Tampa

Early on, my parents encouraged lifelong learning, which has served me well through the years. In fear of leaving someone out or forgetting a name, I’ll try and mention the names of people that have helped me with numismatic advice. 

 

No one has been more generous with general advice and behind-the-scenes information to me than John Spinelli. John has a wealth of information and experience that he has openly shared with me through many phone conversations. Next would be James Hatch (Jim61) and Scott Lindquist. John DeRocker, Fred Bart, Robert Azpiazu, Derek Moffitt, Fred Reed and Carlson Chambliss have also given me valuable advice. Rob, (Numbersman) introduced me to Nancy Poli who performed a small miracle on a scarce Tampa National and David Spencer helped me when I was going through my Web and sheet-note phase. Dan at Currency America and Jim at Tickle Your Fancy helped me with Fancy serial numbers and Lou Dufault helped me with autographed notes and deuces. I thank Greg Alex for peaking my interest in engravings and expanding my numismatic library. I feel the greatest strength of my collection lies in its diversity, in which many have contributed. 

Quote 4
SSC
No one has been more generous with general advice and behind-the-scenes information to me than John Spinelli. John has a wealth of information and experience that he has openly shared with me through many phone conversations.

Thank you very much Steve.   I’ve learned a lot from you over the many years we’ve known each other also.   Your one of the good guys here on this forum and your enthusiasm is unsurpassed.   
Quote 2
lettow
I met Neil Shafer in 1988 at the first show I attended in Milwaukee.  He has been a friend and mentor ever since.
Quote 3
stlnats
When I transitioned to paper from ancient coins, the late Bob Cochran generously provided a ton of information, opinions and direction to get me started in StL area nationals.  And until his death, he always provided friendly enthusiasm and a  good sounding board to help ferret out interesting (to me at least) questions.  As I got into some of the more technical issues, Pete Huntoon has been great in providing direction, introducing me to folks at NARA, etc early on and keeping me from wandering too far into the weeds with some of my crazier and uninformed ideas.  
Always interested in St Louis MO & IL metro and Evansville IN paper money, scrip, financial docs, banking ephemera, etc.  Also collect Latvian 1915 - 1940 city and national paper money by block letter/variety
Quote 2
jhodgson
No mentors, but two philosophies I clearly remember and practiced when assembling my collection:

Amon Carter (at my first Memphis show) - Buy the best note you can afford, even if costs more than you expect.  I spent 90% of the cash I took to the show at his table.  He kept pulling notes out of his steamer trunk, and sold them to me at great prices.  He knew what he was doing - he made me a lifelong collector.

Tom Flynn - "My list of should have bought is a lot longer than my list of should nots."  When on the fence, just buy it.  His saying is so very true for me today.

Want to increase your knowledge about US small sized currency? Find interesting tidbits about US small size currency:

https://www.facebook.com/American-Paper-Connection-Inc-585643014808093/?ref=bookmarks
Quote 5
larry510
Some dealers that treated me well when I first started as a kid.
Joe Sande
Jerry Briggs
Tom Denly
David Koble
Quote 2
TomTomTomTom
my wife..."Don't spend so much money!"
Always looking for high quality fractional notes, specimens, proofs, experimentals and anything fractional related
Quote 6
mebid2much
my wife..."Don't spend so much money!"


+1 HaHa!😁😁😁
Quote 1
Scooter1
+ 2 👍   In red ❗️
Quote 1
JohnDavenport
Don Kelly, who in a previous lifetime was my academic advisor before I ever got into collecting, and Wendell Wolka, who warned me almost twenty years ago that Ohio was hard.  I like to think I've paid back some of the time and effort over the years, by editing the Ohio chapter of Don's recent book, and paying for Wendell's kitchen remodel. 😉
Collector (and SPMC State Expert) of Ohio obsoletes.  SPMC LM #405.  A.k.a. "uzuiwek"
Quote 3
jdizzle

The owner of a local coin shop that I used to go to as a young teenager was helpful and would talk to me about coins and share his enthusiasm for the hobby. His passion for the hobby rubbed off on me and he made me feel like I wanted to be part of the hobby at a young age, even though he knew I wasn’t spending much money at his shop.  Unfortunately, he died a few years later and his son took over the business. And his son didn’t want anything to do with anyone that wasn’t in the shop to spend a decent amount to money. I returned to the shop off and on over the next 15 years or so, as both a 18-year old kid and as an adult collector. Even though I had visited his shop many times and had spent a lot of money (in my perspective, probably not his) he would only give me the time of day after I made a sizeable purchase.

Over the years, I’ve visited a number of local shops and talked to many dealers at local shows. And most of them were the same way as the son of the shop owner. They only would spend time talking to me if they thought I was going to make a big purchase. There were some local and out-of-state dealers who were awesome and would invest time in talking to me or my teenaged kids about their inventory or other topics...some even gave my daughters discounts so they could buy something they wanted that was a bit out of reach financially. But most dealers there just didn’t care. It seems to always be about the money to be made, not about helping to inspire or educate someone that wasn’t spending a ton of money at their table that day. And usually it wasn’t because they were busy helping other customers. If they were busy, it was talking to the dealer next to them. I get it though...time is money and they are in business to make money. And if you’re not spending money, you’re not worth their time. But if dealers like this avoid helping or educating newer or younger collectors so they become interested in the hobby, the future is cloudy at best.

But...about three years ago as I was starting to get into the paper money side of the hobby, I bought a few notes from Phil Thomas (PiBBThug) through his eBay store. These notes were only in the $40-$50 range. After the fourth or fifth note, he reached out to me to chat. Over the last three years, he has spent a lot of time answering my stupid questions over email and texts (and even a few phone calls) so that I could become a more educated collector and informed member of the hobby...even when I wasn’t buying notes from him. He has given me advice on a few expensive notes I’ve considering buying (not from him) and helped me to learn how to grade notes and look for issues. He has always treated me more than fairly with pricing and quite often has made me some incredibly generous offers...instead of trying to maximize his profits on an uneducated collector. He has inspired my love of paper money and is the main reason I am an active part of the hobby today. He would be the closest thing I’ve had to a mentor in the hobby.

There has also been a number of members of the forum here that have been very helpful in answering my stupid questions directly or have helped to educate me by writing informative posts within the forum that I have read after the fact. I’ve learned a lot from a few of you specifically and a few things from a lot of you.

@Steve in Tampa has inspired me to love raw $1’s and appreciate block sets, @Scooter1 has inspired me to love and appreciate WWII notes, and @MEC2 has inspired me to love Nationals and the history behind their towns and banks...and helped me realize my OCD tendencies won’t allow me to collect them. @PiBBThug inspired me to love originality in circulated notes and “miracle of survival” VF PQ notes, LFP notes, mules, and green seals...and @larry510 has inspired me to love red seals more than the green ones. Thanks to all for sharing priceless knowledge and inspiring me to truly love the hobby!

Enamored with VF-35 and lower grade PPQ/EPQ notes!
Quote 6
postalnotes
I have been fortunate to learn from three of the experts in my area of collecting who have generously shared their knowledge with me.  Then too, I have immersed myself in research to learn even more.  Nothing can compare to the joy of friendships in a hobby where we can discuss the topic we are passionate about and perhaps surprise each other with newly-discovered items or information.

Joining numismatic clubs, organizations, and on-line forums is also a great way to learn and share information related to your interests.

I think the bigger question each of us needs to ask ourselves is this: Who have we mentored?

Personally, I enjoy giving coins, currency and encouragement to any young person who shows a genuine interest in numismatics with the hope they will learn, grow, and contribute to this wonderful hobby throughout their lives.


Researching United States Postal Notes 1883-1894.

Quote 4
Springfield
I have talked with many people since I have started collecting currency.  Many of them have also become friends with whom other topics are discussed.  That is what makes the hobby special.  Start out with one topic but can learn and share much more over time. I’m not listing names since I do not want to forget a friend by mistake. 
Quote 1
AceyDeucy
Stanley Morycz, God rest his soul.
Quote 1
armynova
For Confederate and Obsolete - I've had Dr Douglas Ball, Randy Shipley, Hugh Shull as mentors over the years. 
Quote 1
AceyDeucy
I worked with Doug Ball  when he was at NASCA.  Brilliant mind and a nice guy, too!
Quote 0
 
Forum Sponsors

 
 

,