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CurrencyDen1
Here's the main vignette of a Great Republic Gold & Silver Mining Co. of Virginia, bond for £50 dated 1867.  I find it interesting it's not in dollars!  Also, there are two smaller vignettes - Queen Victoria & Lincoln.
cbnc-bond-f.jpg 
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Berny
Yes, I have always liked these unusual denominations.
Not only is it denominated in Pounds, it also has the Queen of England (Victoria) portrait:
Great Republic Gold & Silver Mining Co. of Virginia_f4.jpg 
Here is a dual denomination bond from the Southern Inland Navigation and Improvement Co.:

SouthernInlandNavigation_f4.jpg 
SouthernInlandNavigation_f4 (2).jpg
https://www.papermoneyforum.com/post/something-different-9865506?pid=1305678197&highlight=southern+inland

These companies typically had large foreign investments in the business.
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CurrencyDen1
I went to your original post on the Southern Inland bond.  Interesting chart on the value of the pound sterling vs dollar.  It looks like the $5 to the pound lasted for nearly 150 years, only dropping during World War II.  Great bond!
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GregAlex
Ah, that Great Republic is a nice bond. I like all the vignettes on it -- and the early Queen Victoria is one you don't often see. It's a good reminder that there was a fair amount of European investment in American enterprise.

Continental is another bank note company that doesn't get enough attention, imho. They did some very nice work in the 1870s. I have a couple vignette proofs by CBNC. Haven't figured out where this eagle was used.
  Continental eagle.jpg 
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