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PMG is the Official Grading Service of the Paper Money Forum
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mfontes Show full post »
 
HoneyBadger
Wait a second, maybe I do have the ability to move this. I just noticed the Moderator Tool. Lets try it and see.
FRN Collections Complete - 1928-1934 LGS: $5 [87%] - $10 [37%] - $20 [2%] - $50 [6%] - $100 [0%] - $500 [0%]

http://www.1928notes.com - If you have a new note to add, please let me know.
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HoneyBadger
There we go, now it is in its proper home. I have the ability to move things out, but not back in. Once it leaves Off Topic, it is outside my jurisdiction. 😋
FRN Collections Complete - 1928-1934 LGS: $5 [87%] - $10 [37%] - $20 [2%] - $50 [6%] - $100 [0%] - $500 [0%]

http://www.1928notes.com - If you have a new note to add, please let me know.
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Springfield
I have one note from Don Kelly’s Collection of Large Size Notes.  I purchased it from another dealer but I am very proud to own it as I have been friends with and done lots of business with Don over the years.  
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Cinch
I'm fascinated by pedigrees since they help answer the question, how did this note survive and end up in my hands? I guess this is more relevant for obsoletes since some designs have so few examples that exist today. When the former owners are people who really pioneered numismatics, like John J. Ford, Jr., or Eric P. Newman, I think it's important to record that. Knowing the pedigree also helps me keep track how many of a particular type of note there are out there... Is this one from the American Bank Note Co sale? The Schingoethes? But I don't pay more for the lineage.

As for the more recent pedigrees, those of collectors with deep, deep pockets, I completely see your point. I don't know these people myself and often wonder how big your collection has to get where you name gets in an auction catalog or a PMG label. For instance, I'm not recording purchases from the likes of "LazyEye83727" on eBay because I'm not sure anyone in the future would care (or maybe they would?). (Side question: if a dealer throws a note in a safe for a few years and then sells it, is it part of his "collection"? Or is it just inventory?)

The obsolete world can be pretty small in the end and surely many of our notes were at one time or another owned by a collector with name recognition in the hobby. This is also true with plate notes from books, Bowers and Haxby, etc. I keep track of these things, but I can't imagine it adding anything more than the stamp of authenticity, not value.

All this probably holds true to a lesser extent for collectors of nationals as well.
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element159
I'd like a Col Green pedigreed note. I doubt that there are any that can be traced to him and are remotely within my budget, but I have no idea. I probably did pay extra for my few EPN notes, with more competition, and I did want some of his notes. (I even got two with alligators, though I missed on most of those.)

As far as deep-pocketed collectors putting their own pedigrees on notes, well if they pay for the grading, why not? If you buy their ex-note and don't like it you can put it in your own holders. I usually use Denly so that is not so much expense or trouble 🙂
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Bravo6
Pedigree (to me) is just another of many things to consider for value...... but then if I knew anything, I’d be rich............  (?)
"Don't worry about it, nothing is gonna be O.K. anyway........
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mfontes
I accidentally posted it on the incorrect topic page.  

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jordon
Pedigree is moderately interesting to me. If I see a note that's ex-Grinnell or Green or Newman I nod and go "huh," but I don't seek them out.

That said, I am a little disappointed that I probably couldn't have a pedigree added if I were to TPG a particular note I won from LK's Doris Bart sale, since the face wasn't shown in the catalog.
Florida and Washington state Nationals; engraving errors and varieties; courtesy autographs
SPMC LM449
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