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Berny
I just obtained this note from Heritage. It has some great medallion engravings. These were very difficult to counterfeit.

Post some of your notes or just some images that you have found with medallion engravings.

PA-485-G128_01 (1).jpg 
PA-485-G128_02.jpgCl

Click the image to expand it to see the finely engraved lines. Then click the bottom right arrow to expand some more. Then click the image again.

These were done with a medallion ruling machine that could take a 3-D design and reduce it to a 2-D image.
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oklahomadanny
Takes me back 45 years viewing the terrain maps we used in Nam. Cool images. [thumb]
 
[Avengers100px][CIB3-2][geronimo2] 
  *Dad* 7/21/1916-12/22/2014 *WWII Veteran* Signal Corps *
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ed1862
CCI02122018.jpg
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Berny
Wow, that is one of the hardest Rathbun notes to get.

Here is a Rathbun proof check (post note). I think this might be the only note that has Rathbun's name engraved on it.

It also has some nice medallion engravings.
RathbunPostNoteP_f1_3600.jpg 
RathbunPostNoteP_f1_Medallion.jpg
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GregAlex
Perfect timing, Ed! As it happens, I have a die proof of that maiden medallion. Also an obsolete and a bank check with other medallion engraving examples. I've been calling these cameos, but medallion is the correct technical term. And Danny, you're right, these have the same features as topo maps!

Cameo.jpg  Cameo cu.jpg 

Usage cameo banknote.jpg 
Usage cameo banknote cu.jpg 

Usage cameo check.jpg 
Usage cameo check cu.jpg   
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ed1862
Berny --  I've been extremely lucky over the past few years with regard to Rathbun notes.  Always seemed to be in the right place at the right time.  I have 'complete' collection of Rathbuns that I plan to add to the ODP registry when I get the time.

I also happen to have a similar check proof with medallions - I'll post tonight.

GregAlex -- Great examples!!
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Berny
ed1862 wrote:
Berny --  I've been extremely lucky over the past few years with regard to Rathbun notes.  Always seemed to be in the right place at the right time.  I have 'complete' collection of Rathbuns that I plan to add to the ODP registry when I get the time.

I also happen to have a similar check proof with medallions - I'll post tonight.

GregAlex -- Great examples!!


It might be worthwhile to start a new thread on Rathbun. Even though a search on Rathbun reveals a few threads, I doubt that many new members know too much about him.

I wrote some stuff about his $4 notes over at http://brokenbanknotes.com/bbnmb/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=180&hilit=rathbun&start=15 Unfortunately so many old threads have lost their images.
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ed1862
Here's my Rathbun check proof.  I wonder how many versions may exist?

CCI02132018.jpg 
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newenglandnotes
12.jpg 

File5022.jpg 

File5011ac.jpg 

File5011ad.jpg 
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GregAlex
And here's some trivia that might win you a contest some day...
  • What are the only U.S. postage stamps to feature medallion portraits?
  • What are the largest U.S. postage stamps ever issued?
  • What were the first non-engraved U.S. postage stamps?
And the answer to all of these is the same: The first three newspaper/periodical stamps, issued in 1865. These were used to pay for transport of large bundles of papers by the post office. Although medallion engraving was used to create the central portrait, the stamps were printed lithographically. These stamps measure about 2.5" x 4" -- a bit larger than fractional currency. They were printed by National Bank Note Co. ... which also printed the first fractional currency.

Here's an example of PR2 -- just a sample image, not part of my collection. These are *pricey* and nice copies sell for $700-800.

PR2.jpg 
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GregAlex
Bernie, you may already know about this - Back in 1979, ABNC reprinted a HUGE salesman's sheet, originally engraved in the 1840s for Rawdon, Wright, Hatch & Edson. Among the vast number of vignettes and portraits are quite a few medallion engravings...

FSO1979 sm.jpg 

dragon hat.jpg    Lady medallions.jpg 

Washington Franklin.jpg
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Berny
GregAlex wrote:
Bernie, you may already know about this - Back in 1979, ABNC reprinted a HUGE salesman's sheet, originally engraved in the 1840s for Rawdon, Wright, Hatch & Edson. Among the vast number of vignettes and portraits are quite a few medallion engravings.. ... 


Yes, I do remember this sheet, FSO 1979A. Do you recall whether it came flat or in a tube?

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GregAlex
In a tube. Which I still use to store it.
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GregAlex
Although medallion portraits are relatively rare on stocks and bonds, medallion engraving is actually extremely common -- and it was used even into the 21st Century. Let's see who can spot the medallion engraving on these two stocks...

Little Miami RR 1850s.jpg 
Manhattan Co.jpg
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MaineMoneyMan
The border on the top and the medallion medallion on the bottom.
SPMC PM014835
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Berny
In addition to the border in the first stock certificate, there is medallion engraving surrounding "Authorized capital ..."

Is the bottom medallion medallion engraving or embossing? Many of these on stock certificates are actually embossed. Need an enlargement to tell.

Here is some real medallion engraving (steel):

medallion_f1.jpg
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GregAlex
Well done! On the Little Miami stock the entire frame was done in medallion engraving, as well as the ornamental bar along the right side.

medallion frame.jpg 

And on the Manhattan Co. stock the medallion engraving is the company seal.

medallion seal.jpg 

It's this use of medallion engraving that is the most common on stocks and bonds. On large runs, it wasn't practical to have someone crimp the company seal into each stock certificate. But the company seal needed a three-dimensional appearance and this type of engraving was ideal -- plus each company's embossing seal would be easily available for use in creating the engraving. Probably tens of thousands of varieties of certificates used this device, even modern ones.
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GregAlex
I the process of scanning some things for another project I came across one of my favorite ABNC medallion portraits: Shakespeare! (At least that's who it looks like to me.) The leafy background is also medallion engraving.

Shakespeare medallion.jpg
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Russell Kaye
Two counterfeit, two genuine.


2297.jpg
  2338.jpg  2419.jpg  2497.jpg
Buying, Selling Currency and Sharing Knowledge-Especially Obsoletes.
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GregAlex
Boy, the clunky medallions on the first two make it obvious why this was such an effective anti-counterfeiting technique.
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GregAlex
As far as I know, there are no medallion portraits on any federal notes from the Civil War forward. However, the BEP does have at least a couple in their vaults. This is Commodore Matthew Perry, in case you didn't recognize him. I'm not sure what this was used for but it appears in several Bureau specimen books from the 1870s and '80s.
BEP Perry medallion portrait.jpg

The other is a cameo portrait of Washington from the 1880s. I'm not sure what this was used for either. If anyone recognizes either one let me know.

Washington BEP medallion.jpg
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GregAlex
Today I was surfing through the Stacks Bowers auction archives and came across this amazing printing plate. More medallion portraits than I have ever seen in one place. A lot of these have been posted already in this thread, but there are many more that are unknown to me. Wow! I'd love to see an actual printed sheet from this plate -- it's larger than 22 x 27 inches.

[3038] 
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GregAlex
Time for a bump! A while back I posted a couple medallion engravings from the BEP. There was another one I knew of and I finally nabbed a copy. This is a second BEP engraving of Washington, possibly done from the same cameo -- the engraving itself is about 2" x 2.5". But this one is different from all other medallion engravings that I've seen. A close-up shows that the blank areas around Washington appear to be made of dots. In all medallion engravings I've seen the field around the cameo is made of straight, fine lines. At first I thought I'd purchased a modern print, like a b/w newspaper photo with a dot pattern. But I checked with a friend who also has this engraving and his show the same dots.

I think what we have here is a "double" engraving. A medallion engraving is created using a ruling machine, which slowly pulls a set of tightly spaced pins over the 3-D object (imagine running your comb over a silver dollar). One pass is really enough to do the job, but in this case it looks like they turned it 90 degrees and ran it through again. So those little dots are really little squares where the pins intersected. 

If anyone has an alternate explanation feel free to post it. I still have no examples of what any of these BEP medallion portraits were used for.

My Washington cameo.jpg 
Washington cameo cu.jpg 
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EarlySmallSizeFanatic
Some very nice notes here, thanks for sharing. 
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MEC2
I am a sucker for cameo medallions... amazing artistry for the time... here's a grab bag of just a few...

BankNote1670(1).jpg  BankNote1623(1).jpg  BankNote1566(1).jpg  BankNote1354(1).jpg  BankNote1289(1).jpg 
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