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PMG is the Offical Grading Service of the Paper Money Forum
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GregAlex
Private cards, which are not cataloged by the SCCS, come in all shapes and formats with the common factor that they were not issued by a national hobby organization, bank note company, or government entity. Most were issued by state or local stamp and coin clubs, and nearly all of them were printed lithographically or offset (non-engraved).

I don't personally collect these, but there are hundreds, perhaps thousands, that regularly pop up in stamp show bargain boxes and on Ebay. There are a lots of interesting varieties. Here are a few images I captured (not in my collection). Feel free to post any of yours!

Coin Week Canada 1983.jpg  Compex #12.jpg  Kansas WWII in China card.jpg  Massapequa private card.jpg  People Bank private card.jpg   
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GregAlex
So, here's one I came across on eBay (not my card, I just captured the image). I think this is the first handmade private souvenir card I've seen -- or more precisely a print of a handmade card. This one was produced by Tim Prusmack, who did work similar to JSG Boggs, but was less controversial.

Prusmack card 97.jpg 
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Southpaw
I have a new one I recently scored on eBay. My apologies if I outbid you. The photo in the listing do not do it justice. It was published by George A. Snow in NY 1885. The seller also did not say it was on celluloid! I believe the process was developed by Baldwin and Gleason. Grant-ribbon2.jpg  Grant-ribbon3.jpg  Anyway, it's in great shape with some taters to one of the ends of the ribbon.

Grant-ribbon.jpg 
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GregAlex
That one is really interesting, Southpaw! George Snow wasn't a security engraver, so it doesn't quite qualify as a forerunner, but it's a very high quality engraving. A lot of political ribbons were produced in the 19th century, but they were usually for elections. This one is pretty obviously a memorial ribbon. Celluloid, though, that's unusual. Is it flexible or brittle?
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Southpaw
I have a few celluloids from Baldwin and Gleason. It is flexible but it will break if bent too far. It is not like modern plastics
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DonEinNY
Here's an interesting one for the tercentenary of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1982.  It is on balsa wood and was produced by Bob Du Bois in 1981.  Given the content, it must have been issued for a coin and paper money show.

Phila Tercentenary on Balsa Wood.jpg
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GregAlex
Well, look at that! I've been toying with the idea of a souvenir card on wood for a couple years. Seems like it might make an interesting collaboration with wooden money collectors. But apparently someone else had the same idea about 35 years ago! My idea would be to try it with intaglio printing, though. I know it's possible, but the results might not be top quality.
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techwriter
A memory from 35 years ago (as of tomorrow):
card_WCW1984_proclamation.jpg 
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techwriter
To follow on with Greg's original post; the set of private issue cards for Coin Week Canada 1983 consisted of 6 cards; here are the remaining 5.
cwc-1983_seriesA-2.jpg 
cwc-1983_seriesA-3.jpg 
cwc-1983_seriesA-4.jpg 
cwc-1983_seriesA-5.jpg 
cwc-1983_seriesA-6.jpg 
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techwriter
Since we're here, there were also 6 cards issued for World Coin Week 1984:
card_WCW1984_B1.jpg  card_WCW1984_B2.jpg  card_WCW1984_B3.jpg  card_WCW1984_B4.jpg  card_WCW1984_B5.jpg  card_WCW1984_B6.jpg 
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GregAlex
Neat stuff, Les! I wonder why they chose to feature some of those in the second set. Most are common enough that they could have attached the actual banknote, as the ANA did for many of their private cards. I really like that Bank of Canada $25, though!
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techwriter
Greg, check your PMs.
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DepressionScripGuy (Rod)
Very cool cards.
Come see a forgotten piece of history...
http://www.depressionscrip.com
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