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GregAlex

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As I was working on the Q category of souvenir cards for the SCCS website I made an interesting discovery. What are Q cards? They are a series of cards commissioned by dealer Lee Quast and printed by Michael Bean. All of them are printed from intaglio plates, most of which were originally engraved for various banknote companies.

Not many collectors know much about these because they weren't well publicized. Many have low print numbers. We now have data and images for all but one posted on the website.

The discovery came as I was corresponding with Lee -- he informed me that most of these cards, going back to the 1990s, are still available at their original issue prices! There's a downloadable price list posted, which I'll include here, if anyone is interested. I know, I know: "Greg, you're making me collect MORE souvenir cards!?" Call me a sadist … but look at some of the ones you can get for $5 each! [biggrin]


[Q-12] 
[Q-13] 
Q-25.jpg  Q-29.jpg  Q-33.jpg

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Berny

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"All of them are printed from intaglio plates, most of which were originally engraved for various banknote companies."

Since these cards are "private" and since most of the vignette die plates were sold during 2006-10, where did these vignette die plates come from?
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GregAlex

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I think most of the intaglio printing plates that Mike Bean used to print cards in the 1990s came from more obscure bank note companies that were not associated with ABNC, such as the Philadelphia Bank Note Co. Being in the Plate Printers Union, he had better connections to pick up this kind of material. I've always thought it would be a fun project to research the vignettes on these cards and determine where they originated.

Also -- even though the ABN Archive auctions didn't start selling off printing plates and transfer rolls until 2006, all the archive material was in private hands much earlier, by the early '90s. It's very likely some of the plates were privately sold off or given away before they were offered in auctions.
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