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Cinch
Any thoughts on what this might be? Maybe a plate used to make contemporary counterfeits of this obsolete? A modern creation? Did early obsolete engravers ever use single-note plates or were four-issue designs always the standard? What about the metal?

I don't own it, fyi, and can't examine it closer.

Here's some background on the bank.

Hope Bank - Plate-2.jpg 
I bought the printing below on eBay a few years ago which appears to be made from this plate. The seller had a few of them but no idea where they came from. The president's signature is engraved, while the cashier's is not.
hopebankfull.jpg 
RICurrency.com, old banknotes from Rhode Island
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Sergei Aleksandrov
Admittedly the image of the plate is low resolution and it is kind of hard to determine whether it is the real thing or not.  For one thing, lighting has to be adjusted, the other thing please adjust the photo quality and provide closeups of the vignettes - that is where the detail should exist.
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MaineMoneyMan
He said he didn’t own the plate.
SPMC PM014835
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purduenut
The note is from the Hope Bank of Warren, Rhode Island. Counterfeits are listed for the $2 so this could be a copper plate used to produce the counterfeit While four subject plates were predominant, there are lots of two subject and sometimes single subject plates that were used. The choices were steel if you anticipated long use or copper if you expected small quantities to be needed. Copper was easier to engrave but wore much more quickly than steel. A copper single subject plate would suggest use by counterfeiters. It's also possible this was part of a larger plate that's been cut up. 
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YoungCollector
The plates are manufactured by pressing a steel roller into the softer material of the plate.
On occasion you will see these rollers for sale.
This might be a modern plate impression made from an authentic contemporary roller. 
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