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Numbersman
Just received this beauty.I love all low serials but especially large size.It was touted as the low serial number known and initially I doubted it until I checked (and then double checked). Sure enough, checking all of HA and T&P, this note is, by far, the lowest (regardless of prefix) with the next lowest  being B3016.Still, how could the first 528 notes never (at least up to the present) show up? And what about the next 2487 notes? You have to wonder....where are all of these notes? Thoughts?

DSC07965.jpg
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Steve in Tampa
Good question Rob. Why is it some of these have a bluish tint to the left of the portrait and some don’t ? It has to be paper, right ?
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YoungCollector
When rainbows were issued, a paper dollar wasn't worth as much as a gold dollar -but sometimes passed near that value.
One had to worry in 1873 that the paper would be devalued to near nothingness (as the continentals were) so you had to be pretty brave to just tuck away a piece of useless paper.
A dollar back then was worth closer to $100 today, so you had to be careful.

By 1880 paper dollars were trading at par to gold dollars and, in fact, the first Series 1880 $1 Legal Tender (Z1) is in collectors' hands.

Where are low serial rainbows?  They were turned in for gold at the first chance.
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YoungCollector
Good question Rob. Why is it some of these have a bluish tint to the left of the portrait and some don’t ? It has to be paper, right ?


Surely @Steve in Tampa cannot be asking about the blue stripes without joking???? 
Excuse me if I am being dense.
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Steve in Tampa
Are my eyes playing tricks on me ? I see a bluish tint left of the portrait.
1D4A3555-8412-4AB7-98CA-71EDE7541B41.jpeg 
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Numbersman
That is a trait of most of the denominations in the Rainbow series.Here's a pic of the 2 to compare.

fullsizeoutput_1c0.jpeg 
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currencytreasures
I believe it was a result of "end paper."  The roll of paper on the printing press was nearing it's end and would need to be replaced soon.  This is seen on only a couple of the early large size notes.  First charter nationals are another, I believe.

Similar to when you get a receipt at the grocery store when the register tape is nearing its end.
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EarlySmallSizeFanatic
I am suspecting the non blue tint notes could be a new variety ???

Perhaps the very earliest notes didn't have the tint ? 

See link below: The A block was the LAST block to be printed, and the first was the B block, making Rob's note the 529th 1869 to be printed. 

http://www.uspapermoney.info/serials/u1869_s.html

As for where are they: I would bet most ended up being spent until worn out and then destroyed. 
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YoungCollector
@Steve in Tampa
@EarlySmallSizeFanatic
From the comprehensive catalog:

"Most notes have a blue localized stain, but some of the earlier printings lack this feature." ... a few were also issued on the watermarked paper intended for fractionals.

I have read elsewhere that some people think these all should all be different F numbers in the way that 1862 legal's have a zillion F numbers ... 
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Steve in Tampa
 From the comprehensive catalog:
"Most notes have a blue localized stain, but some of the earlier printings lack this feature." ... a few were also issued on the watermarked paper intended for fractionals. 

Thanks @YoungCollector, I knew it had to be the paper and not something involving the printing process.
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FraudAlert
Numbersman wrote:
That is a trait of most of the denominations in the Rainbow series.Here's a pic of the 2 to compare.
Fr_27_$1LTN_35.jpg 
Fr_27_$1LTN_35_rev.jpg  Congratz on the low serial number. it's a big time note. Also your two pictures here are quite informative. Because of lack of blue tint in the lower note, you can really see where the green tint ends above the U in United States. Whereas in most 1869's the blue tint blends into the green tint at that location thus the "rainbow" fame. It was mentioned some fractionals have this blue tint and I have attached an fr-27 I picked up at GC because of the great colors and that blue tint. I am pretty sure the blue tint was a security feature but I noticed some Fr-27's don't have it at all. Also note the blue stripe is to the left of the portrait on the Fr-18's and to the right on the Fr-27's. Can anyone please enlighten or point to reading material on what notes this blue stripe occurred on and for what purpose? Thanks!
fullsizeoutput_1c0.jpeg 
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YoungCollector
If I recall correctly, the blue tint is a security feature of the paper and appeared on all notes issued within a given time frame.  As pointed out above, it also appears on some 1st charter nationals.  Silvers and gold's were not being printed at the time ...  I read this somewhere, but I can't remember where now.
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MEC2
I thought this was widely known on this series, the blue is part of the security for the paper of the 69 series... you'll also see them in the 1875 nationals as well...
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Steve in Tampa
MEC2 wrote:
I thought this was widely known on this series, the blue is part of the security for the paper of the 69 series... you'll also see them in the 1875 nationals as well...

Indeed, but my question was why some have it, and some don’t.
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YoungCollector
If only uspapermoney.info's serial tables listed what ranges had the blue tints!
What a useless site!    ;-)
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telephoto1

Indeed, but my question was why some have it, and some don’t.


I've always marveled at the paper variations in the rainbows...when I first saw one of the pieces sans the blue strip I first thought either the note had been washed or perhaps it wasn't genuine. TBH I'm not totally convinced that there aren't some good fakes in tpg holders right now.
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currencytreasures
The blue tint is called "blue end paper" in dealer lingo, and is usually considered a desirable quality.  It is seen on some 1869 Rainbows, early 1870's legals, and 1st charter nationals.  Maybe some other obscure pieces as well.  Some notes have it and some don't.  The only logical explanation I've heard is that the blue tint indicates that the roll of paper in the printing press was nearing it's end and would need to be replaced soon.
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YoungCollector
The hypothesis that the blue tint means the paper roll was nearing its end is false.

Let’s all agree on that now.
Vote me up or down!
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currencytreasures
Interesting indeed
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Steve in Tampa
Thread from 5 years ago on Coin Talk discussing this very subject. The comments by member Numbers is Derek from uspapermoney.info.
https://www.cointalk.com/threads/2-different-types-of-1869-1-rainbow-notes.270973/
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FraudAlert
Thread from 5 years ago on Coin Talk discussing this very subject. The comments by member Numbers is Derek from uspapermoney.info.
https://www.cointalk.com/threads/2-different-types-of-1869-1-rainbow-notes.270973/


Thanks. Very useful. So embedded security fibers are responsible for the blue tint and everyone agrees there is no sub-types of the 1869's. Just variations of the blue. And I know the blue can be found on early nationals and I've seen it on Stanton fractionals. I am still wondering if the Fr-27 (1878 LTN's) also had the blue security shown in the pic above and why it was to the right of the portrait. If you look close there is an abundance of security fibers so I assume Fr-27 also had the blue tint? Also wondering if this blue was ever the result of end of the paper roll. Thanks for any further info.
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Dan Cong
I would think the blue is more random, and since variable, would be the security feature, as it would be harder to duplicate.  i would think if I wanted to indicate the approaching end of a roll of paper, it would be a change in the margin for instance rectangular black boxes that increase in frequency and size based on proximity to end. I would have also assumed that banknotes were printed from sheets, not rolls. (even if paper comes in rolls, cut to sheets to be printed)

Randomized patterns on paper were very popular in that period. 

cxvxcbvzbxb.jpg 
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