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tigertrader

I guess this is good for the hobby... Or maybe shows why many people think they have some super rare circulated star note and put ridiculous prices on it and throw it on Ebay...

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/man-reveals-hidden-meaning-tiny-165236084.html
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mfontes

Well, I will disagree with the statement that the rarest star notes may not be wort much if they are dirty.  I’ll take any beat down dirty rare note especially a star note. 

This information will get people excited, but we all know the chances of finding a rare note in your wallet is not that great.  

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MEC2
Yahoo is a garbage site - it's clickbait for mouthbreathing millennial window lickers. The story is factually incorrect, as one comment pointed out. It is not a total loss, as this comment is pure internet gold:

"Rick at Pawn Stars will give you $0.50 for that $1.00 bill. Cuz you know, it's gonna take up space in his shop, and it could take a long time before the right buyer comes along."
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jdizzle

In don’t think anything that gets the average Joe or Jane to start looking closer at paper money in circulation is a bad thing. Yes, the article is over over the top and creates a false sense of “here’s all you have to do to make money without working for it”, which is the fantasy of a lot of people, especially entitled younger people. But if a small portion of those average Joes/Janes starts looking at paper money in circulation and/or sold values on eBay, there is always the possibility, although remote, that they may see something that plants a seed of curiosity or piques their interest. Such as, while looking on eBay, “why does that note have blue serial numbers and talk about exchanging it for silver”? Or, “I didn’t know there are $2 bills with red ink, instead of green, and a different back...I’ve only seen the green ones that Grandma gives me on my birthday”. Or, “wow...look at how big that note is...and the designs are like artwork”! 

Granted there may be one out of every 1000 people that get curious to start looking into the hobby and don’t get mad when finding out the worn out $1 star note they got in change from Walmart isn’t worth a fortune. But I think any visibility into paper money for the average Joes/Janes can’t be considered a bad thing. We need new blood in the hobby...and it’s has to start somewhere. 

My interest in coins and paper money started by looking through my change when I was young. And developed slowly years later when I started looking on different types of notes eBay and other internet sites. And while I don’t spend nearly the money that most people on that forum do, I’ve spent far more money on notes over the last three years that I ever imagined. And I love the hobby. And my kids now love the hobby. Maybe another average Joe like me sees that article and starts to develop that same interest I did. Or some younger average Janes like my daughters. Who knows?!?

Enamored with VF-35 and lower grade PPQ/EPQ notes!
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mfontes
I would also say that those people who see that video may look at a few dollars, but after disappointing results the excitement will wear off.  I look at the notes I get in change (if I use currency) and I know what I'm looking for, but at times I forget as well.  
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arianzo
I doubt that the note sold for $32 bucks has the same grade that the note he he has in possession....
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tigertrader
MEC2 wrote:
Yahoo is a garbage site - it's clickbait for mouthbreathing millennial window lickers.


I cant argue with that! ðŸ˜‚
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HoneyBadger
Could not agree more...Yahoo is one of the worst “news” sites. It’s total tabloid junk. Maybe they will post an article about what Chrissy Teigen thinks about it.

😡
FRN Collections Complete - 1928-1934 LGS: $5 [87%] - $10 [37%] - $20 [2%] - $50 [6%] - $100 [0%] - $500 [0%]

http://www.1928notes.com - If you have a new note to add, please let me know.
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HoneyBadger
While I am on the subject, and because I hate Yahoo...here are some more thoughts. How about the headlines (and articles) that are deliberately written in the most vacuous language possible. In fact, let me write a few alternative Yahoo headlines for this Star note article...

“People Are Buying Star Notes...And We Can’t Handle It.”

”Someone Paid $32 For A Star Note, And It Broke The Internet.”

”Chrissy Teigen Claps Back At Critic Of Her Star Note Purchase.”
FRN Collections Complete - 1928-1934 LGS: $5 [87%] - $10 [37%] - $20 [2%] - $50 [6%] - $100 [0%] - $500 [0%]

http://www.1928notes.com - If you have a new note to add, please let me know.
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postalnotes
I quit reading the article after they implied each star note had the same serial number as the note it was replacing, except for the ✰.

It did, however, conjure up a fond memory of my grandmother. Many years ago, about the time the bicentennial two-dollar notes were being released, she sent Christmas cards to our family.  Inside two of the cards were crisp, new two-dollar bills, each being a star in the serial number.  Not knowing much about them, but enough to know they were replacement notes, I put them away for safe-keeping and forgot about them.

Fast forward a couple of decades, I pulled out those notes--and to my surprise, they were issued out of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve.  Yes, they were I-✰ sequential serials! Both CU. I got almost $400 for the pair.

Thank you grandma! â¤

Researching United States Postal Notes 1883-1894.

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